Latest Additions to Leopard OS X

Latest Additions to Leopard OS X

Jun 12

When OS X 10.5: Leopard debuts in October, it will feature a redesigned Desktop and new Finder. Those new features were among the changes Steve Jobs introduced during a preview of the forthcoming OS X update code-named Leopard during his Worldwide Developers Conference keynote speech Tuesday.

Originally slated for a spring 2007 release, OS X 10.5 is now slated for release in October. It will cost $129, Jobs told WWDC attendees. The finished version of Leopard includes 300 new and enhanced features; Jobs previewed 10 during his Tuesday keynote.

The redesigned Desktop does away with the blue background familiar to OS X 10.4 users. Instead, Jobs said, the Desktop has been redesigned to better accommodate the digital photos that most Mac users employ as the background image on their Desktops. With Leopard, the Menu Bar will be transparent and the Dock will be more three-dimensional. But more significantly, the redesigned Desktop in Leopard introduces Stacks—a collection of folders that reside in the desktop. Apple sees Stacks as a way to clean up Desktop clutter. Files are collected in the Stacks for rapid access; click on the Stacks icon and the Dock and the files and folders fan out or appear in a grid. Clicking on one of those icons instantly launches the relevant app.

News Source: PC World

Apple Safari 3 Beta Available on Windows

Apple Safari 3 Beta Available on Windows

Jun 11

Isn’t it ironic? At the end of 2005, Microsoft decides to discontinue Internet Explorer for Mac support and now in mid-2007, Apple Incorporated decides Safari is coming to Windows. Safari will join iTunes and QuickTime as the third Macintosh application officially ported to the Windows platform.

At Apple’s World Wide Developers Conference in San Francisco today, the company announced the availability of the Safari 3 beta for OS X, Windows XP and Windows Vista.

Some of our users are testing the browser with absolutely no problems while others are finding bugs that range from install failures and crashing to incorrect web site rendering and ridiculous memory usage. Safari 3 will most likely go final in time for Leopard’s release in October of this year. Apple is touting Safari as being able to load pages roughly twice as fast as Internet Explorer and 42% faster than Firefox. Is Apple pulling typical marketing antics or are the numbers dead on? You be the judge.

This is BETA software!, please use caution when installing it on your system
Download: Safari 3 Beta

iPhone Sales Training Workbook Leaks

iPhone Sales Training Workbook Leaks

Jun 10

The team over at Mac Rumors has done it once again. This time around, approximately half of the official AT&T iPhone Sales Training Workbook has been scanned and released to the web. Within these pages, we learn a bit more about the iPhone than previously known. The most noticeable bullet points, however, are focused on features that the iPhone doesn’t include. Oddly missing is support for instant messaging and MMS. Also excluded is support for AT&T specific services such as Media Net, Cellular Video, Media Mall, and TeleNav.

While this may all seem like doom and gloom, the truth is Apple has compensated for a few of these short comings. To make up for the lack of IM, Apple has included threaded SMS conversation support. Of course, this may only serve to help AT&T to push their SMS packages, but it does help remove the sting, a bit. Also, to fill the void left by the exclusion of MMS support, the iPhone will allow users to email video and photos along with rich formatted text. On top of that, the device includes support for Yahoo!’s Push Email service which will automatically notify you when you have new mail in your Yahoo! mailbox.

News source: Mac Rumors

Anger Over DRM-free iTunes Tracks

Anger Over DRM-free iTunes Tracks

Jun 09

The launch of the DRM-free music store from Apple has been overshadowed by news that tracks purchased from the store contain information of who bought the songs embedded into the files. Some fear that should these tracks make their way onto file sharing sites that the original owners could easily be identified.

The tracks from record company EMI cost more and are of a better quality than standard iTunes songs. Apple has yet to comment on what it plans to do with the information embedded in the music files. Many news sites are already speculating that it will be a matter of time before software becomes available that will strip personal data from the downloaded files.

News source: BBC

Vista’s UAC Will Reform Developers

Vista’s UAC Will Reform Developers

Jun 08

When it comes to the new security functions in Windows Vista, User Account Control is the one people tend to scratch their heads over, Gartner Analyst Neil MacDonald said during his presentation on implementing Vista security at Gartner’s IT Security Summit here on June 4. “It’s one that has plenty of people confused regarding what, exactly, it is,” MacDonald said.

In fact, UAC isn’t one capability; rather, it’s a set of Vista capabilities that collectively help to limit the ability of applications and users to make unsanctioned system changes—whether the user is running as an administrator or as a standard user. “The idea is that when a piece of software is asking for user credentials … you shouldn’t just hand them over,” MacDonald said. UAC’s raison d’être is basically to cure the new operating system of a legacy of bad applications that freely granted administrator rights—a tendency that has eased malware writers’ jobs. “Malicious code would be far less effective if users ran without administrative privileges,” MacDonald said.

News source: Vnunet

Sun confirms OS X Leopard will use ZFS

Sun confirms OS X Leopard will use ZFS

Jun 07

Sun Microsystems has confirmed that Apple will use Sun’s Zettabyte File System (ZFS) for the forthcoming OS X 10.5 Leopard due in October. Sun chief executive Jonathan Schwartz said at a company event in Washington DC on Wednesday that Apple will officially reveal the technology at its World Wide Developer Conference scheduled for San Francisco next week.

ZFS is the world’s first 128-bit file system, supporting 18 billion times the storage capacity of current-generation 64-bit systems. A zettabyte is equal to 1,024 exabytes or 1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 bytes. Sun developed the technology and has released it under an open source licence. The file system is currently deployed in Sun’s Solaris operating system. ZFS promises improved data integrity compared with Apple’s current Journaled HFS+ file system.

News source: Vnunet